asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.
asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation 
Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…
Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.
The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.
When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.

asylum-art:

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation

Dan Tobin Smith's sweeping color gradient installation in his London studio is a sight behold. he wanted to create a huge installation out of thousands of unwanted objects. The result, The First Law of Kipple, opens in a couple of weeks and some early images of it suggest he’s turned all that waste into something rather beautiful…

Tobin Smith has assembled the 200 square metre installation in his studio as part of London Design Festival 2014. It is made up of thousands of objects that he has collected and that have been donated by the public via the website CallForKipple.com.

The objects are arranged chromatically and have been laid out across the studio floor with such care that the colours blend into one another seamlessly: reds flow into browns, pinks and purples; sea greens into shades of turquoise and dark blue.

When it opens on September 13, visitors will be able to walk through the work via a series of pathways.

asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.
asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery
Oddments Room
Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.
Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.

asylum-art:

Jane and Louise Wilson 303 Gallery

Oddments Room

Internationally acclaimed artists Jane and Louise Wilson are known for their film and photographic works, often exploring states of consciousness and the experience of place. This summer a series of large-scale photographs from their ongoing investigation into the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster premieres at the John Hansard Gallery. The exhibition also features a number of other works, many previously unseen in the UK.

Atomgrad (Nature Abhors a Vacuum), 2010 is a suite of eight photographic prints depicting deserted interiors from the abandoned town of Pripyat, situated within the 30km wide Exclusion Zone around the site of the disaster. Books remain on shelves and desks, bed frames remain intact and once-exquisite parquet flooring lies on the ground like rubble. A yardstick appears within each image and is a recurring motif throughout the exhibition. These objects of measurement – functional yet obsolete – act as a marker of scale and order, alluding to the tensions between association and analysis, memory and material fact.

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.
asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb
Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.

asylum-art:

Wooden Cityscapes Sculpted by James McNabb

Like other miniature cityscapes we’ve featured in the past, The City Series depicts tiny skyscrapers made out of unusual materials. But that’s where the likeness to other exhibits ends. McNabb describes his artistic process as “sketching with a band saw.” Each element of the exhibit displays intricate building-like forms shaped from woods of different light and dark tones. McNabb says his initial intent was not to build skylines, but individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day he noticed that they began to resemble a miniature city, and from there The City Series was born.

(via asylum-art)

brianmichaelbendis:

sequentialsmart:

Pages from Scarlet, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Alex Maleev.It’s a truly stand-out comic that can turn something as basic as introducing a character’s back story, into a visually memorable sequence.  
At first glace, it just looks like fifteen panels in standard layout. But it’s really fifteen snapshots of the defining moments and characteristics in Scarlet’s life to date. Note that the last panel of a Portland landmark, which breaks the rhythm established so far, is enlarged to emphasize the most telling quality about her.
It’s exposition done as only a comic can do.

https://www.comixology.com/Scarlet/comics-series/4532
brianmichaelbendis:

sequentialsmart:

Pages from Scarlet, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Alex Maleev.It’s a truly stand-out comic that can turn something as basic as introducing a character’s back story, into a visually memorable sequence.  
At first glace, it just looks like fifteen panels in standard layout. But it’s really fifteen snapshots of the defining moments and characteristics in Scarlet’s life to date. Note that the last panel of a Portland landmark, which breaks the rhythm established so far, is enlarged to emphasize the most telling quality about her.
It’s exposition done as only a comic can do.

https://www.comixology.com/Scarlet/comics-series/4532
brianmichaelbendis:

sequentialsmart:

Pages from Scarlet, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Alex Maleev.It’s a truly stand-out comic that can turn something as basic as introducing a character’s back story, into a visually memorable sequence.  
At first glace, it just looks like fifteen panels in standard layout. But it’s really fifteen snapshots of the defining moments and characteristics in Scarlet’s life to date. Note that the last panel of a Portland landmark, which breaks the rhythm established so far, is enlarged to emphasize the most telling quality about her.
It’s exposition done as only a comic can do.

https://www.comixology.com/Scarlet/comics-series/4532

brianmichaelbendis:

sequentialsmart:

Pages from Scarlet, written by Brian Michael Bendis, art by Alex Maleev.

It’s a truly stand-out comic that can turn something as basic as introducing a character’s back story, into a visually memorable sequence.  

At first glace, it just looks like fifteen panels in standard layout. But it’s really fifteen snapshots of the defining moments and characteristics in Scarlet’s life to date. Note that the last panel of a Portland landmark, which breaks the rhythm established so far, is enlarged to emphasize the most telling quality about her.

It’s exposition done as only a comic can do.

https://www.comixology.com/Scarlet/comics-series/4532

(via hexakozioihexekontahexa)